duTrieux Descendants p2

Johannes Glen
b. 28 Nov 1683, d. 05 Dec 1709
Pedigree

     Johannes Glen was the son of Capt. Johannes Sanders Glen and Anna Peake. Johannes Glen was born on 28 November 1683. He died on 5 December 1709.

Jacob Sanderse Glen
b. 27 Feb 1685/86
Pedigree

     Jacob Sanderse Glen was the son of Capt. Johannes Sanders Glen and Anna Peake. Jacob Sanderse Glen was born on 27 February 1685/86.
(ancestor of Glen family of Baltimore, MD).

Anna Glen
b. 19 Dec 1688
Pedigree

     Anna Glen was the daughter of Capt. Johannes Sanders Glen and Anna Peake. Anna Glen was born on 19 December 1688.

Gysbert Van Imbroech

     Gysbert Van Imbroech married Rachel de La Montagne, daughter of Rachel De Forest.
     Child of Gysbert Van Imbroech and Rachel de La Montagne:
Elizabeth Van Imburgh+   (1659)

Rachel de La Montagne
d. 04 Oct 1664
Pedigree

     Rachel de La Montagne was the daughter of Rachel De Forest. Rachel de La Montagne married Gysbert Van Imbroech. Rachel de La Montagne died on 4 October 1664.
She captured by Indians at Wiltwyck on 7 June 1663.
     Child of Rachel de La Montagne and Gysbert Van Imbroech:
Elizabeth Van Imburgh+   (1659)

Rachel Peek
b. c 31 Aug 1684
Pedigree

     Rachel Peek was the daughter of Elizabeth Van Imburgh. Rachel Peek was born circa 31 August 1684. She married Arie Koning on 13 September 1707.

Maria Peek
b. c 11 Jul 1686, d. b 1690
Pedigree

     Maria Peek was the daughter of Elizabeth Van Imburgh. Maria Peek was born circa 11 July 1686. She died before 1690.

Johannes Peek
b. c 09 Sep 1688
Pedigree

     Johannes Peek was the son of Elizabeth Van Imburgh. Johannes Peek was born circa 9 September 1688. He married Tryntje Hellacker on 5 October 1709 at New York, NY.

Gysbert Peek
b. c 26 Oct 1690
Pedigree

     Gysbert Peek was the son of Elizabeth Van Imburgh. Gysbert Peek was born circa 26 October 1690.

Maria Peek
b. c 09 Apr 1693
Pedigree

     Maria Peek was the daughter of Elizabeth Van Imburgh. Maria Peek was born circa 9 April 1693.

Anna Peek
b. c 19 Jun 1695
Pedigree

     Anna Peek was the daughter of Elizabeth Van Imburgh. Anna Peek was born circa 19 June 1695. She married John Bogert on 10 March 1715/16 at New York, NY.
     Child of Anna Peek and John Bogert:
Annatje Bogert

Jacobus Peek
b. c 21 Jul 1697
Pedigree

     Jacobus Peek was the son of Elizabeth Van Imburgh. Jacobus Peek was born circa 21 July 1697. He married Sarah Cornelese Banta on 5 January 1716/17 at Hackensack, NJ. Jacobus Peek married Rachel Demarest on 14 October 1726 at Hackensack, NJ.

Philippe du Trieux
b. c 1588, d. 23 Jul 1649

     Philippe du Trieux was born circa 1588 at Roubaix, France (then the Lower Netherlands). He married Jaquemyne Noirett, daughter of Arnould Noirett and Barbe du Chesne, on 11 April 1615 at Amsterdam, Holland.1 Philippe du Trieux married Susanna du Chesne on 17 July 1621 at Amsterdam, Holland. (Philippe du Trieux may have died on 23 July 1649). He died before 8 September 1653 at New Amsterdam, New Netherland; possibly killed by Indians.
Philippe du Trieux was also known as Philip de Truy. He was a Protestant Walloon. He emigrated in 1624 from Leiden, Holland, to New Amsterdam on the ship ‘New Netherland.’ He was appointed Court Messenger by Director Kieft in 1638. He received patent for lands in ‘Smits Valley’ in 1640.

It was originally thought that the name De Trieux or Du Trieu was derived from the Village of Trieu in southern Belgium. However, it seems that it is in fact from the old French word ‘trieu’, meaning ‘uncultivated ground’, or ‘bushy field’. The family was (and still is) centred in the Comté de Hainaut region of Belgium, which once included part of northern France. It is from De Trieux that the names Du Trieu, De Truy, Truax, etc. have been evolved. Individuals bearing the original form of the name abound in the Walloon Church Registers of Holland as early as 1584, wandering from city to city and from country to country, evidently in search of business employment. They were Walloons, an ancient Celtic race which inhabited parts of France, the Alps and the Danubian Valley. They eagerly embraced the Reformation, which was eventually crushed out by Charles V and Philip II, and hundreds of thousands of the Walloons sought refuge in neighboring countries. One hundred thousand exiled families settled in the Netherlands.

Many of the Du Trieux family fled the persecutions. Some found sanctuary in England, and a large family group went, in exile, to the Netherlands. In the Netherlands, which had recently declared its independence from Spain, the Du Trieuxs and other Walloon families settled in Leiden and Amsterdam. As skilled artisans, these Walloons found employment, assistance, civil and religious freedoms. Among these was Philippe Du Trieux, born about 1588 at Roubaix in what is now France. The names of his parents are not known.

By 1614, Philippe Du Trieux was a skilled craftsman in Amsterdam, serving as a dyer. In 1615, in the Walloon Church of old Amsterdam, he married Jacquemine Noiret, a fellow Huguenot, from Lille, France. In 1620, Jacquemine died, leaving Philippe with three small children – Marie (Maria), Philippe Jr., and Madeline, who died in infancy. In 1621, Philippe married Susanna Du Chesne (possibly a cousin of his first wife), from Sedan, France. To them was born a son, Jerome, in the fall of 1623, but he too would die in infancy.

In the meantime, the West India Company was being established to develop international commerce and to serve as a military arm of the Netherlands. A brisk fur trade had developed in the Hudson Valley region of America, and in 1623 the West India Company made the decision to occupy the land between the Delaware Valley and the Connecticut River with permanent settlers. Philippe and his fellow Walloons had long been seeking the means to settle either in North or South America. His family, along with 29 other families largely of Walloon identification, entered into a contract with the West India Company to relocate to America.

Philippe, his wife Susanna, and their two surviving children Philippe and Marie, departed the Netherlands at the beginning of March 1624 on the ship “New Netherland” (Nieu Nederlandt). He and his fellow emigrants came as free men and were granted freedom of conscience in all religious matters. The Captain of the “New Netherland” was Cornelis Jacobz May of Hoorn. They went by the Canary Islands, steered toward the west coast where they gained a west wind which took them to the river called Rio De Montaagnes (River Mauretius). The ship sailed up to the Maykens 44 leagues. They built a fort named “Orange” which had 4 bastions on an island they called Castle Island. Some believe that all of the Walloons of the company settled on Long Island at Waal-Bogt (Walloon’s Bay) which is now Wallabout. However, there is no definite account of the disposition of these families, and even the ship’s passenger list has since been lost.

More people came in 1625 bringing tools and livestock. In May 1626 another band of colonists arrived along with Peter Minuit, who had been given the power to be Governor and organize a government. He built Fort Amsterdam on the southernmost point of the island and bought the whole island of Manhattan from the Indians for about 60 guilders (or what is commonly accepted these days as being about $24.00).

Upon the purchase of Manhattan Island in 1626, all Dutch and Walloon settlers were gathered from their original 1624 settlement points and brought to New Amsterdam. There, Philippe and Susanna’s family continued to expand, with daughters Sarah, Susanna, Rachel and Rebecca, and sons Abraham, Isaac and Jacob all being born in the New World. Philippe became an employee of the West India Company and served until his death as the court messenger or marshal, a post to which he was appointed in 1638 by Governor Kieft (who became Governor in March 1638). The salary for the Court Messenger (or Marshall) was “two thirds as large as was received by the Magistrate”. He built a house, possibly the first house, on Bever Graft (Beaver Street) near the Fort. In 1640 he received a patent for land in Smits Vly (or Valley) along the East River, although it is known that this parcel of land was in his possession as early as 1638.

Philippe Du Trieux is much of record under the Dutch on early Manhattan Island, as are some of his children and his sons-in-law. Some tidbits from the court records of the time include the following:

26 Jul 1638 Return of Philip De Truy, Court Messenger, to a summons on Gillis Pietersen.
26 Aug 1638 Symon Dircksen Pos vs. Philip De Truy, action of debt.
2 Sep 1638 Same. Claim on defendant delivering to plaintiff all the fish in his house.
4 Oct 1638 Philip De Truy and Wolphert Gerritsen (Declaration), respecting language of Anthony Jansen of Salee, when asked to pay money to the Rev. Mr Bogardus (quoted above).
15 Mar 1639 Declaration.. Jacob Stoffelsen and others that Grietje Reyniers called Philip DeTruy a liar, and that they called each other several bad names.
15 Mar 1639 Declaration. Jacob Stoffelsen and others that Anthony Jansen called Philip De Truy a villain.

(from “The Calendar of Dutch Manuscripts”, edited by E.B. O’Callaghan)

Philippe Du Trieux was murdered by Indians, as was his son Philippe, some time before September 8, 1653. Some believe that Indians were not the guilty parties. Philippe’s exact date of death is not known. The records show that on September 8, 1653 “Carel Van Brugge, Pltf. vs. Isaac D’Foreest, Deft. as Vendue-Master of the personal estate of Pieter Cornelisen, mill-wright, demands payment of fl. 59.8 for goods purchased at public vendu. Deft. acknowledges having purchased the goods, but says, in the name of Philip D’Truy’s widow, that her son Philip (who was also murdered) had earned fl.100 monthly wages of Pieter Cornelisen deceased, which are still due him. Deft. is ordered to prove at the next court day his demand against the State of the above-named Pieter Cornelisen deceased.” On October 23, 1654, Susanna De Scheve, widow of Phillippe De Truwe, late Court Messenger at New Amsterdam, confers power of attorney upon her son-in-law Isaac De Forrest.

Philippe could have been dead as early as March 16, 1651 when a certified copy of a note of Alexander Boyer was made in favor of Susanna Du Truy. It is doubtful that she would have had to conduct this business if her husband had still been living.

Over the years, the Du Trieux surname has been corrupted to Truax, Truex, Trueax, and several other spellings. Today, almost all people with these surnames (with some specific exceptions) are descended from Philippe Du Trieux, and are therefore all cousins.

(this Du Trieux family history is adapted from one prepared by Combs Craig Truax, with additional information from Eric du Trieu de Terdonck of Belgium).

     Children of Philippe du Trieux and Jaquemyne Noirett:
Philippe du Trieux   (03 Jan 1616 – b 1617)
Maria du Trieux+   (05 Apr 1617 – b 1684)
Philippe du Trieux   (10 Feb 1619 – 23 Jul 1649)
Madeleine du Trieux   (09 Feb 1620 – 1620)
     Children of Philippe du Trieux and Susanna du Chesne:
Jerome du Trieux   (20 Oct 1623)
Sarah du Trieux+   (c 1625 – 09 Nov 1692)
Susanna du Trieux+   (1626 – 1660)
Abraham du Trieux+   (1632 – a 20 Aug 1662)
Rachel du Trieux+   (1635)
Rebecca du Trieux+   (c 1636)
Isaac du Trieux+   (24 Apr 1642 – c 1702)
Jacob du Trieux+   (02 Dec 1645 – 27 Dec 1709)
  1. [S4521] Marriage Record from the Amsterdam Archives, film roll #419, pg. 51.

Jaquemyne Noirett1,2
b. c 1592, d. c 1620
Pedigree

     Jaquemyne Noirett was the daughter of Arnould Noirett and Barbe du Chesne. Jaquemyne Noirett was born circa 1592 at Ryssel (Lille), France. She married Philippe du Trieux on 11 April 1615 at Amsterdam, Holland.2 Jaquemyne Noirett died circa 1620 at Leiden, Holland.
Jaquemyne Noirett was also known as Jaquemine Noiret.
     Children of Jaquemyne Noirett and Philippe du Trieux:
Philippe du Trieux   (03 Jan 1616 – b 1617)
Maria du Trieux+   (05 Apr 1617 – b 1684)
Philippe du Trieux   (10 Feb 1619 – 23 Jul 1649)
Madeleine du Trieux   (09 Feb 1620 – 1620)
  1. [S3923] Baptism Records from the Walloon Church, Amsterdam, Holland.
  2. [S4521] Marriage Record from the Amsterdam Archives, film roll #419, pg. 51.

Maria du Trieux
b. 05 Apr 1617, d. b 1684
Pedigree

     Maria du Trieux was the daughter of Philippe du Trieux and Jaquemyne Noirett. Maria du Trieux was baptized on 5 April 1617 at Leiden, Holland. She was associated with Pieter Wolphersen, son of Jacob Couwenhoven?. Maria du Trieux married Cornelis Volkertsen Viele, son of Volkert Maertnesen Seylemaecher and Marritjen Jens, before January 1641. Maria du Trieux married Jan Peek in 1650. Maria du Trieux died before 1684 at Schenectady, NY?.
Maria du Trieux was also known as Maria Truax. She was banished from New Amsterdam in 1664.

Maria Truax was the eldest daughter of Philippe du Trieux and his first wife Jacquemyne Noirett. She was baptized in Leyden, Holland, on 5 April 1617, and emigrated with her family to New Amsterdam in 1624. Her first son, Aernoult, was baptised on May 27, 1640, and since no father is mentioned, it is surmised that the child was born out of wedlock. The father may or may not have been Cornelis Volckertsen Viele, whom Maria married some time before January 1642. We know this because of an adoption paper which mentions her husband. This paper constitutes an acknowledgment of the paternity of her second child, Aeltjem, by Pieter Wolphersen van Couwenhoven.

Cornelius Volckertsen Viele was a ‘tapper’ or tavern keeper. It is probable, however, that Maria was really the one in charge, as it was generally against Maria that the numerous complaints about the tavern were made. The first of these was in 1646, when Maria was accused of selling liquor to the Indians, a serious crime at the time. Her husband made some attempt to molify the authorities, but the complaints kept coming and came to include accusations of fraud in Maria’s management of her husband’s trading deals during his absence.

Some time before 1650, Cornelius Volckertsen died (probably of stress), and Maria married Jan Peek, who was also an early settler of New Amsterdam. He is described as an eccentric character – part Indian trader, part broker, part general speculator, even once described as a pirate – and after his marriage to Maria, he also became a tavern-keeper. He had established a trading post a few miles up the Hudson River, where a small creek came to bear his name – Jan Peeck’s Kill, from which the nearby town of Peekskill, NY takes its name.

Maria continued to get into trouble with the authorities, this time apparently in collaboration with her new husband, who seems to have shared her temperment and her attitude towards authority. An item dated October 19th, 1654 states: “Cornelis van Tienhoven, as Sheriff of this city, represents to the Court, that he has found drinking clubs, on divers nights at the house of Jan Peck, with dancing and jumping and entertainment of disorderly people; also tapping during preaching, and that there was great noise made by drunkards, especially yesterday, Sunday, in this house, so that he was obliged to remove one to jail in a cart, which was a most scandalous affair. He demands, therefore, that Jan Peck’s license be annulled, and that he pay a fine…” The court agreed, and Jan was fined and his license was revoked.

In the weeks that followed, Jan Peek made several appeals to the Court to allow him to resume his business, as he was “burthened with a houseful of children and more besides”. The Court finally took pity on him and gave him one last chance to operate his tavern according to the law, but in December he was once again charged with tapping after hours, and his license was revoked again. He spent the next ten years making real estate deals and working as a broker between the Dutch and English merchants, and apparently also continued to do business as a tapster. Maria herself was charged several more times during this period with liquor infractions, as well as with some shady business dealings which she tried to blame on her husband. Finally, in 1664, Maria was charged with selling liquor to the Indians once too often, and she was fined 500 guilders and banished from the island of Manhattan.

Maria went to live with her son Jacobus in Schenectady at this point, but since the English took over New Amsterdam shortly after her banishment, she soon returned there and bought a house on Hoogh Straet (Duke’s Street). She is thought to have died in Schenectady some time between 1671 and 1684.

Reference=5

     Children of Maria du Trieux and Cornelis Volkertsen Viele:
Aernoudt Viele   (27 May 1640)
Cornelis Cornelisen Viele+   (05 Feb 1643 – c 1690)
Jacomintje Viele   (20 Aug 1645)
Pieter Viele   (09 Feb 1648)
     Child of Maria du Trieux and Pieter Wolphersen:
Aeltjem Pieters van Couwenhoven   (b 1642)
     Children of Maria du Trieux and Jan Peek:
Anna Peake+   (15 Oct 1651 – 19 Dec 1689)
Johannes Peake   (12 Oct 1653)
Jacobus Peake+   (16 Jan 1656)
Maria Peake   (06 Mar 1658)

Arnould Noirett
b. c 1550

     Arnould Noirett was born circa 1550 at France?. He married Barbe du Chesne.
     Child of Arnould Noirett and Barbe du Chesne:
Jaquemyne Noirett+   (c 1592 – c 1620)

Barbe du Chesne
b. c 1555

     Barbe du Chesne was born circa 1555 at France?. She married Arnould Noirett.
     Child of Barbe du Chesne and Arnould Noirett:
Jaquemyne Noirett+   (c 1592 – c 1620)

Susanna du Chesne1,2
b. c 1601, d. a 1654

     Susanna du Chesne was born circa 1601 at Sedan, Lorraine, France. She married Philippe du Trieux on 17 July 1621 at Amsterdam, Holland. Susanna du Chesne died after 1654.
     Children of Susanna du Chesne and Philippe du Trieux:
Jerome du Trieux   (20 Oct 1623)
Sarah du Trieux+   (c 1625 – 09 Nov 1692)
Susanna du Trieux+   (1626 – 1660)
Abraham du Trieux+   (1632 – a 20 Aug 1662)
Rachel du Trieux+   (1635)
Rebecca du Trieux+   (c 1636)
Isaac du Trieux+   (24 Apr 1642 – c 1702)
Jacob du Trieux+   (02 Dec 1645 – 27 Dec 1709)
  1. [S3883] Records of the Reform Dutch Church of New Amsterdam.
  2. [S3923] Baptism Records from the Walloon Church, Amsterdam, Holland.

Sarah du Trieux
b. c 1625, d. 09 Nov 1692
Pedigree

     Sarah du Trieux was the daughter of Philippe du Trieux and Susanna du Chesne. Sarah du Trieux was born circa 1625 at New Amsterdam, New Netherland. She married Isaac De Forest, son of Jesse De Forest, on 9 June 1641 at New Amsterdam, New Netherland.1 Sarah du Trieux died on 9 November 1692 at Albany, NY.
Sarah du Trieux was also known as Sara Philips.

Reference=6

     Children of Sarah du Trieux and Isaac De Forest:
Jessen De Forest   (09 Nov 1642 – b 1644)
Susanna De Forest+   (22 Jan 1645 – 05 Oct 1702)
Gerrit De Forest   (21 May 1646 – b 1647)
Gerrit De Forest   (10 Jun 1647 – b 1650)
Marie De Forest   (10 Jan 1649 – 1651)
Michel De Forest   (10 Jan 1649)
Jan De Forest   (27 Mar 1650)
Philip De Forest   (28 Jul 1652)
Isaac De Forest   (25 Apr 1655)
Henricus De Forest   (09 Sep 1657)
David De Forest   (01 Aug 1660 – b 1663)
David De Forest   (19 Dec 1663)
Marie De Forest   (07 Jul 1666)
David De Forest   (07 Sep 1669)
  1. [S3883] Records of the Reform Dutch Church of New Amsterdam.

Isaac du Trieux
b. 24 Apr 1642, d. c 1702
Pedigree

     Isaac du Trieux was the son of Philippe du Trieux and Susanna du Chesne. Isaac du Trieux was baptized on 24 April 1642 at New Amsterdam, New Netherland; wits: Mr. Herman Reyniers, Jan Willemszen Schut, Philip Gerritsz., Sara du Trieux, Sara Roelofs.1,2 He married Maria Wilemse Brouwer, daughter of Willem Brouwer and Elisabeth Drinckvelt. Isaac du Trieux died circa 1702 at Schenectady, NY.

There was originally some confusion as to whether Isaac and his brother Jacob were the sons of Philippe Du Trieux Sr., or of his eldest son Philippe. It is now generally accepted, however, that they are of the second generation of this family and not the third, and that Philippe Jr. never married or had children.

Isaac was the progenitor of the Schenectady branch of the Truax family. He settled on the ‘second flat’ of the Mohawk River (now the town of Rotterdam) as early as 1670 along with his cousin, Jacobus Peek (Maria’s son). Isaac was probably a tavern-keeper like his sister, and it appears that several generations of his descendants carried on the family business. Isaac married Maria Willemse Brouwer some time before 1683. Maria was the daughter of Willem Brouwer and Elisabeth Drinckvelt. Willem Brouwer was an early resident of Beverwyck, having settled there as early as 1657.

At various times in its early history, Schenectady suffered from the attacks of the French and the Indians. The most memorable of these attacks was in February, 1690. Schenectady is said to have had at this time about 80 houses and 400 inhabitants. Six months earlier, fifteen hundred Indian warriors had attacked the French Canadian town of Lachine, apparently in an effort to please their English allies who had just declared war on France. The citizens of Lachine did not yet know about the war, so the town was unfortified and undefended when the Indians descended and slaughtered 24 men, women and children. Then they razed the town and took about 70 prisoners, many of whom were never seen again. The French assumed, rightly or wrongly, that the English were behind the attack, and decided to respond in kind in the winter of 1690. It was under these circumstances that an expedition was sent by the French from Canada, with the intention of striking a blow at Albany (then called Orange) or Schenectady (then called Corlard).

The French, under Lieutenants Le Moyne de Sainte Helene and Dailleboust de Mantet, organized a party consisting of about 210 men, including 16 Algonquins and 80 Iroquois from the Sault. After marching five or six days from Montreal, they considered whether to try to take Orange, which was the capital of New York, or whether to attack the more vulnerable Corlard. On the advice of the Indians, they chose the latter course and headed towards Schenectady. The attack was a brutal one, as described by Mons. de Monseignat, Comptroller-General of the Marine in Canada:

“The signal of attack was given Indian fashion, and the entire force rushed on simultaneously. M. de Mantet placed himself at the head of one detachment and reached a small fort where the garrison was under arms. The gate was burst in after a good deal of difficulty, the whole set on fire, and all who defended the place were slaughtered. The sack of the town began a moment before the attack on the fort. Few houses made any resistance. The massacre lasted two hours. The remainder of the night was spent in placing sentinels and in taking some rest. The house belonging to the minister [Rev. Peter Tassemaker] was ordered to be saved, so as to take him alive to obtain information from him; but as it was not known, it was not spared any more than the others. He was killed in it and his papers were burnt before he could be recognized.”

Every house in town but two was set ablaze. The French lost only two men in the attack on the town, although they lost another 19 on the difficult journey back to Canada. Of the inhabitants of Schenectady, 60 were slain in the massacre, 27 were carried into captivity, one (or possibly more) escaped to Albany, and the remainder probably fled for refuge to their friends and neighbors who were settled along the river. One of these survivors was Isaac Du Trieux. He received “8 ells of pennestout and 40 ells of linen” as a refugee of the massacre.

(information taken in part from “The History of Schenectady County”).

Reference=11

     Children of Isaac du Trieux and Maria Wilemse Brouwer:
Maria Truax+
Sarah du Trieux
Eva Truax+   (04 Jun 1679)
Abraham Truax+   (1684 – 16 Mar 1770)
William Truax   (23 May 1686)
Isaac Truax+   (02 Mar 1690)
Lysbeth Truax+   (03 Jul 1692)
Jacob Truax+   (09 Oct 1694 – 16 Mar 1770)
Johannes Truax   (16 Dec 1696)
  1. [S209] Frederick Adams Virkus, Compendium of American Genealogy; First Families of America, Vol. VII, 1942, p. 437, Compendium of American Genealogy; First Families of America, Vol. VII, 1942, p. 437.
  2. [S3883] Records of the Reform Dutch Church of New Amsterdam, NYGBR Vol 5 Pg 31.

Jacob du Trieux
b. 02 Dec 1645, d. 27 Dec 1709
Pedigree

     Jacob du Trieux was the son of Philippe du Trieux and Susanna du Chesne. Jacob du Trieux was baptized on 2 December 1645 at New Amsterdam, New Netherland; wits: Jan Evertszen Rout, Marie du Trieux, Sara du Trieux.1,2 He married Lysbeth Post, daughter of Lodewyck Post and Agnietje Bonen, on 26 September 1674 at New Orange, NY. Jacob du Trieux died on 27 December 1709 at Newcastle, DE.
He was the progenitor of the ‘New Scotland branch.’ He sold his land in New Jersey in 1708 and moved to New Castle Co., Delaware.

Reference=12

     Children of Jacob du Trieux and Lysbeth Post:
? Truax+
Agnietie Truax+   (05 Dec 1675 – a 1734)
Phillip Truex+   (c 1676 – b 25 May 1734)
Susanna Truax   (15 Mar 1679)
Cornelis Truax+   (c 1680 – 22 Aug 1730)
Jacob Truax+   (10 Oct 1683 – 1761)
William Truax   (10 Oct 1683 – 1729)
Isaac Truax   (c 1685)
Benjamin Truax   (c 1686)
  1. [S3883] Records of the Reform Dutch Church of New Amsterdam.
  2. [S209] Frederick Adams Virkus, Compendium of American Genealogy; First Families of America, Vol. VII, 1942, p. 437.

Philippe du Trieux1
b. 03 Jan 1616, d. b 1617
Pedigree

     Philippe du Trieux was the son of Philippe du Trieux and Jaquemyne Noirett. Philippe du Trieux was baptized on 3 January 1616 at Amsterdam, Holland; witnesses: Arnoult Noiret, Jaspar du Trieux, Jacquilamme Hiole.1 He died before 1617.

Reference=2

  1. [S3923] Baptism Records from the Walloon Church, Amsterdam, Holland.

Philippe du Trieux1
b. 10 Feb 1619, d. 23 Jul 1649
Pedigree

     Philippe du Trieux was the son of Philippe du Trieux and Jaquemyne Noirett. Philippe du Trieux was baptized on 10 February 1619 at Amsterdam, Holland; wits: Grigolle Swemelle, Thomas Mutau, Marynes Anne of Swatripon, Susenne Shonselle.1 (Philippe du Trieux may have died on 23 July 1649). He died on 8 September 1653 at New Amsterdam, New Netherland; killed by Indians.

Reference=3

  1. [S3923] Baptism Records from the Walloon Church, Amsterdam, Holland.

Madeleine du Trieux1
b. 09 Feb 1620, d. 1620
Pedigree

     Madeleine du Trieux was the daughter of Philippe du Trieux and Jaquemyne Noirett. Madeleine du Trieux was baptized on 9 February 1620 at Amsterdam, Holland; wits: Symon Brocat, Melchior Lescalie, Jenne and Isabeu Noirez.1 She died in 1620.

Reference=4

  1. [S3923] Baptism Records from the Walloon Church, Amsterdam, Holland.

Isaac De Forest1
b. 10 Jul 1616, d. 1674
Pedigree

     Isaac De Forest was the son of Jesse De Forest. Isaac De Forest was baptized on 10 July 1616 at Leyden, Holland. He married Sarah du Trieux, daughter of Philippe du Trieux and Susanna du Chesne, on 9 June 1641 at New Amsterdam, New Netherland.1 Isaac De Forest died in 1674 at New Amsterdam, New Netherland.
He emigrated in 1637 from Netherlands, on the ship Renselaerwyck.
     Children of Isaac De Forest and Sarah du Trieux:
Jessen De Forest   (09 Nov 1642 – b 1644)
Susanna De Forest+   (22 Jan 1645 – 05 Oct 1702)
Gerrit De Forest   (21 May 1646 – b 1647)
Gerrit De Forest   (10 Jun 1647 – b 1650)
Marie De Forest   (10 Jan 1649 – 1651)
Michel De Forest   (10 Jan 1649)
Jan De Forest   (27 Mar 1650)
Philip De Forest   (28 Jul 1652)
Isaac De Forest   (25 Apr 1655)
Henricus De Forest   (09 Sep 1657)
David De Forest   (01 Aug 1660 – b 1663)
David De Forest   (19 Dec 1663)
Marie De Forest   (07 Jul 1666)
David De Forest   (07 Sep 1669)
  1. [S3883] Records of the Reform Dutch Church of New Amsterdam.

Cornelis Volkertsen Viele
d. c 1649
Pedigree

     Cornelis Volkertsen Viele was the son of Volkert Maertnesen Seylemaecher and Marritjen Jens. Cornelis Volkertsen Viele married Maria du Trieux, daughter of Philippe du Trieux and Jaquemyne Noirett, before January 1641. Cornelis Volkertsen Viele died circa 1649.

Cornelis Viele was probably born in Hoorn, North Holland. Certainly a trader and tavern-keeper of New Amsterdam in 1639; probably a sailmaker and trader of Hoorn. A document dated June 5, 1614 states that Cornelis Volkertszen, Bookseller resided at Hoorn on the Nieuwland (street) in the house called “`t Vergulde Claver” (the golden clover). He was an investor in the ship “The Fortuyn” which explored the Hudson River in 1613 just four years after Henry Hudson (1609). He was also an investor in the New Netherland Company formed to explore and settle New Amsterdam. He evidently followed his investment by settling in New York.

     Children of Cornelis Volkertsen Viele and Maria du Trieux:
Aernoudt Viele   (27 May 1640)
Cornelis Cornelisen Viele+   (05 Feb 1643 – c 1690)
Jacomintje Viele   (20 Aug 1645)
Pieter Viele   (09 Feb 1648)

Pieter Wolphersen
Pedigree

     Pieter Wolphersen was the son of Jacob Couwenhoven?. Pieter Wolphersen was associated with Maria du Trieux, daughter of Philippe du Trieux and Jaquemyne Noirett.
Pieter Wolphersen was also known as Wolphersen van Couwenhoven.

Acknowledgement of paternity of Maria
Truax’s child by a man other than her
husband (1642, New Amsterdam)

I, the undersigned Pieter Wolphersen, hereby acknowledge for myself, my heirs and successors that this day, date underwritten, I have adopted, as I do hereby adopt, Aeltjem Pieters van Couwenhoven, my own daughter, whom I have begotten and procreated by Maria de Truy, promising therefore that from this date I shall do by the above-named, my daughter, as a god fearing father is bound and ought to do by his own legitimate daughter; therefore, I hereby discharge and release Cornelis Volckersen, husband and guardian of the aforesaid Maria de Truy, from all charges and responsibilities incidental to the bringing up of a child till she becomes of age; I, Pieter Wolphersen, promising to look after the child, to let her learn to read and to bring her up according to my means. Furthermore, if I do not beget any children by my present wife, the above named child shall be my rightful heiress and inheritrix, as if she were duly begotten in lawful wedlock, and if it happen that children be begotten by me and my wife, the above named Aeltjen Pieters shall receive, like the legitimate children on my side, a just child’s portion of all such goods, means and effects as it shall please the Lord God Almighty to bestow on me. Requesting that this may have effect before all courts, I have signed this without fraud in the presence of the subscribing witnesses hereto invited. Done, the 7th day of January 1642.

This is x the mark of Pieter Wolphersen
Jacob Couwenhoven
Philippe du Trieux
Acknowledged before me,
Cornelis van Tienhoven, Secretary.

     Child of Pieter Wolphersen and Maria du Trieux:
Aeltjem Pieters van Couwenhoven   (b 1642)

Aeltjem Pieters van Couwenhoven
b. b 1642
Pedigree

     Aeltjem Pieters van Couwenhoven was the daughter of Pieter Wolphersen and Maria du Trieux. Aeltjem Pieters van Couwenhoven was born before 1642; out of wedlock. She married Ludovicus Cobes. Aeltjem Pieters van Couwenhoven married Dirk Ofmulder.
Aeltjem Pieters van Couwenhoven was also known as Alida Pieterse.

Jacob Couwenhoven?

     Jacob Couwenhoven? married an unknown person.
     Child of Jacob Couwenhoven?:
Pieter Wolphersen+

Jan Peek
b. c 1615, d. a 1664

     Jan Peek was born circa 1615 at Netherlands. He married Maria du Trieux, daughter of Philippe du Trieux and Jaquemyne Noirett, in 1650. Jan Peek died after 1664 at New Amsterdam.
Jan Peek was also known as Jan Peake. He immigrated before 1650 to New Amsterdam.
An early settler of New Amsterdam, where for many years he and his wife kept an Inn. Frequent prosecutions were instituted against them for selling spirits without license and for selling to the Indians. The creek at Peekskill takes its name from him.
     Children of Jan Peek and Maria du Trieux:
Anna Peake+   (15 Oct 1651 – 19 Dec 1689)
Johannes Peake   (12 Oct 1653)
Jacobus Peake+   (16 Jan 1656)
Maria Peake   (06 Mar 1658)

Anna Peake
b. 15 Oct 1651, d. 19 Dec 1689
Pedigree

     Anna Peake was the daughter of Jan Peek and Maria du Trieux. Anna Peake was baptized on 15 October 1651 at New Amsterdam, New Netherland.1 She married Capt. Johannes Sanders Glen, son of Sander Leendertse Glen and Catalyn Donckers, on 2 May 1667. Anna Peake died on 19 December 1689 at Schenectady, NY.
Anna Peake was also known as Annatje Peake.

Reference=17

     Children of Anna Peake and Capt. Johannes Sanders Glen:
Catrina Glen   (23 Mar 1671/72 – 15 Feb 1730/31)
Jacomyntje Glen   (09 May 1674 – 06 Feb 1730/31)
Sander Glen   (30 Nov 1676 – 17 Dec 1686)
Maria Glen   (21 Mar 1678)
Helena Glen+   (02 Nov 1681)
Johannes Glen   (28 Nov 1683 – 05 Dec 1709)
Jacob Sanderse Glen   (27 Feb 1685/86)
Anna Glen   (19 Dec 1688)
  1. [S3883] Records of the Reform Dutch Church of New Amsterdam.

Jacobus Peake
b. 16 Jan 1656
Pedigree

     Jacobus Peake was the son of Jan Peek and Maria du Trieux. Jacobus Peake was baptized on 16 January 1656 at New Amsterdam, New Netherland.1 He married Elisabeth Teunise Van Woert circa 1680.
Jacobus Peake lived near Isaac du Trieux on the Mohawk River.

Reference=19

     Children of Jacobus Peake and Elisabeth Teunise Van Woert:
Sara Jacobs Peek
Maria Peek
Annatje Peek+
Johannes Peek+
Ludovicus Peek   (14 Jul 1686)
Margriet Peek   (27 Mar 1692)
Elizabeth Peek   (27 Mar 1695)
Jacobus Peek+   (28 Dec 1698)
  1. [S3883] Records of the Reform Dutch Church of New Amsterdam.

Jacomyntje Glen
b. 09 May 1674, d. 06 Feb 1730/31
Pedigree

     Jacomyntje Glen was the daughter of Capt. Johannes Sanders Glen and Anna Peake. Jacomyntje Glen was born on 9 May 1674 at New York, NY. She married Jacobus Van Dyck. Jacomyntje Glen died on 6 February 1730/31.

Volkert Maertnesen Seylemaecher

     Volkert Maertnesen Seylemaecher married Marritjen Jens.
     Child of Volkert Maertnesen Seylemaecher and Marritjen Jens:
Cornelis Volkertsen Viele+   ( – c 1649)

Marritjen Jens

     Marritjen Jens married Volkert Maertnesen Seylemaecher.
     Child of Marritjen Jens and Volkert Maertnesen Seylemaecher:
Cornelis Volkertsen Viele+   ( – c 1649)

Aernoudt Viele
b. 27 May 1640
Pedigree

     Aernoudt Viele was the son of Cornelis Volkertsen Viele and Maria du Trieux. Aernoudt Viele was baptized on 27 May 1640; possibly out of wedlock. He married Gerritje Gerritse Vermeulen.

Aernout Viele often accompanied his step-father, Jan Peek, on his trading trips up the Hudson River, and through him came to learn the ways and the language of the Indians as well as the English. These became valuable skills when he later became an independant trader and served as an interpreter and principal mediator between the Mohawk Indians and the English in New York State. In 1687, he was part of a trading expedition to the Ottowa country and beyond to the Great Lakes region, where his party was taken captive by the French, ‘robbed of all they had’, and held for four months in Quebec. In 1692, he led an expedition into Shawnee country in the Ohio River Valley to set up trading relations with them. He and his companions spent the next two years exploring the area, and in doing so became the first white men to travel the entire length of the Ohio River. He returned with nearly a thousand Shawnee, whom he had persuaded to settle near the English and become their allies.

Reference=13
Cornelis Cornelisen Viele
b. 05 Feb 1643, d. c 1690
Pedigree

     Cornelis Cornelisen Viele was the son of Cornelis Volkertsen Viele and Maria du Trieux. Cornelis Cornelisen Viele was baptized on 5 February 1643 at New Amsterdam, New Netherland.1 He married Suster Bouts. Cornelis Cornelisen Viele died circa 1690 at Schenectady, NY.

Cornelius lost his father, Cornelius Volkertszen when he was only six years of age. His father’s place was quickly taken (1650), according to the custom of the times, by Jan Peek. Under the care of a very capable mother and that active trader, his Step-father, he grew up with an understanding of the Indian — his ways, his language and his manner of trading — which fitted him to be an interpreter, as was his brother, Aernout, a friend of the Red man, and also, no doubt, somewhat of a trader in his tavern in Schenectardy. There is record of his acting as interpreter and of his refusing to so ace. There is a record of a gift to him from the Indians, which vouches for their friendly feeling, and doubtless, their sense of obligation, for the Indians never forgot a friend any more than they did an enemy. His license as a tavern keeper in Schenectady was granted him in 1672 as a special favor from the Albany authorities for services rendered to them, so that while he may not have been as brilliant as his brother, Aernout, He was a dignified substantial, and worthy representative of that brave and hardy bank of pioneers who held for many years the outposts of civilization in New York State. It has been reported that a party was being held at his tavern the night of a bloody Indian massacre. He probably survived since his name is on the list of survivors to receive assistance, but he undoubtedly died shortly thereafter, perhaps from his wounds. After 1690 he is no longer mentioned in the records and his tavern was taken over by Douve Aukes who also adopted his son, Cornelis JR. Aukes may have married Suster (CC Viele’s Widow) after his death. The name “Suster” was perpetuated in the family for 150 years since each descendant had named a child, Suster. The name is not in any other record of early Dutch Families in New York.

Reference=14

     Children of Cornelis Cornelisen Viele and Suster Bouts:
Jannetje Viele
Cornelis Viele
Elizabeth Viele
Pieter Viele
Blandina Viele
Annetje Viele
Volkert Viele
Debora Viele   (c 1673)
  1. [S3883] Records of the Reform Dutch Church of New Amsterdam, baptisms.

Jacomintje Viele
b. 20 Aug 1645
Pedigree

     Jacomintje Viele was the daughter of Cornelis Volkertsen Viele and Maria du Trieux. Jacomintje Viele was baptized on 20 August 1645 at New Amsterdam, New Netherland.1

Reference=15

  1. [S3883] Records of the Reform Dutch Church of New Amsterdam.

Pieter Viele
b. 09 Feb 1648
Pedigree

     Pieter Viele was the son of Cornelis Volkertsen Viele and Maria du Trieux. Pieter Viele was baptized on 9 February 1648 at New Amsterdam, New Netherland.1

Reference=16

  1. [S3883] Records of the Reform Dutch Church of New Amsterdam, baptisms.

Suster Bouts

     Suster Bouts married Cornelis Cornelisen Viele, son of Cornelis Volkertsen Viele and Maria du Trieux. Suster Bouts married Douve Aukes? after 1690.
     Children of Suster Bouts and Cornelis Cornelisen Viele:
Jannetje Viele
Cornelis Viele
Elizabeth Viele
Pieter Viele
Blandina Viele
Annetje Viele
Volkert Viele
Debora Viele   (c 1673)

Debora Viele
b. c 1673
Pedigree

     Debora Viele was the daughter of Cornelis Cornelisen Viele and Suster Bouts. Debora Viele was born circa 1673 at Schenectady, NY. She married Daniel Ketelhuyn on 16 August 1695.

Jannetje Viele
Pedigree

     Jannetje Viele was the daughter of Cornelis Cornelisen Viele and Suster Bouts.

Cornelis Viele
Pedigree

     Cornelis Viele was the son of Cornelis Cornelisen Viele and Suster Bouts.

Elizabeth Viele
Pedigree

     Elizabeth Viele was the daughter of Cornelis Cornelisen Viele and Suster Bouts.

Pieter Viele
Pedigree

     Pieter Viele was the son of Cornelis Cornelisen Viele and Suster Bouts.

Blandina Viele
Pedigree

     Blandina Viele was the daughter of Cornelis Cornelisen Viele and Suster Bouts.

Annetje Viele
Pedigree

     Annetje Viele was the daughter of Cornelis Cornelisen Viele and Suster Bouts.

Volkert Viele
Pedigree

     Volkert Viele was the child of Cornelis Cornelisen Viele and Suster Bouts.

Daniel Ketelhuyn

     Daniel Ketelhuyn married Debora Viele, daughter of Cornelis Cornelisen Viele and Suster Bouts, on 16 August 1695.

Maria Wilemse Brouwer1
b. 04 Jun 1653
Pedigree

     Maria Wilemse Brouwer was the daughter of Willem Brouwer and Elisabeth Drinckvelt. Maria Wilemse Brouwer was baptized on 4 June 1653 at Albany, NY.2 She married Isaac du Trieux, son of Philippe du Trieux and Susanna du Chesne.
     Children of Maria Wilemse Brouwer and Isaac du Trieux:
Maria Truax+
Sarah du Trieux
Eva Truax+   (04 Jun 1679)
Abraham Truax+   (1684 – 16 Mar 1770)
William Truax   (23 May 1686)
Isaac Truax+   (02 Mar 1690)
Lysbeth Truax+   (03 Jul 1692)
Jacob Truax+   (09 Oct 1694 – 16 Mar 1770)
Johannes Truax   (16 Dec 1696)
  1. [S4002] Jonathan Pearson, Genealogies of the First Settlers of Schenectady.
  2. [S3869] Records of the Reformed Dutch Church of Albany, NY.